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Mine hunters of the Baltic Sea

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The Baltic Sea is said to contain 30,000 pieces of leftover unexploded ordnance from two world wars. Follow the Latvian minehunter M-06 Tālivaldis on its mission to dispose of them.

Synopsis

The Baltic Sea is said to contain 30,000 pieces of leftover unexploded ordnance from two world wars. Follow the Latvian minehunter M-06 Tālivaldis on its mission to dispose of them. The crew of Latvian minehunter M-06 Tālivaldis explain how these historic mines pose a threat to both military and civilian ships today, and why it is so important to dispose of them. The ship has been part of Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group One several times; this group is responsible for countering the threat of sea mines and unexploded ordnance in the northern seas.

This is a rare opportunity to explore life on board a Latvian Navy mine hunting ship as it conducts its work in the Baltic Sea. This footage includes shots of the Tālivaldis in the Baltic Sea, searching for and destroying unexploded historic ordnance as well as interviews with crew members.

Prior to filming, NATO videographers tested negative for COVID-19, allowing them to operate in a bubble alongside the ship’s crew, which had quarantined prior to deployment.

Transcript

This is the international version of an edited video. Please refer to the master or master with subtitles versions for the full transcript.
Music
Entering the unknown – Chausda, Kribos, The black sheep – Malis, Secret hours – Opus, New generations – Azbel, Kingdom of fairies – Sans, Others lives – Panunzi, People of the sea – Malis, Phalanx – Sound, All for one - Scherle
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Reference
NATO848353
ID
1732